Abate Technologies International, Inc.

ATI QUARTERLY
1st QUARTER 2002

 

RULE REQUIREMENTS KICK IN
NEW EPA REGIONAL ADMINISTRATOR APPOINTED
WOODWORKING OPERATIONS FURTHER REGULATED
EPA PROPOSES FULL APPROVAL OF SOUTH COAST TITLE V PROGRAM
CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DISTRIBUTIVE GENERATION
URBAN AIR POLLUTION INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

 

RULE REQUIREMENTS KICK IN

Provisions of two South Coast Air Quality Management District rules are now in effect. Rule 1171 (Solvent Cleaning Operations) and Rule 1132 (Large Solvent and Coating Operations) will affect businesses in the Southland.

The 1999 amendments of Rule 1171 contain various requirements that became effective on December 1, 2001. The purpose of this rule is to reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and stratospheric ozone-depleting or global-warming compounds from solvent cleaning operations and activities, and from the storage and disposal of these materials used in solvent cleaning. This rule applies to all persons who use VOC-containing materials in solvent cleaning operations during the production, repair, maintenance, or servicing of parts, products, tools, machinery, equipment, or general work areas, and to all persons who store and dispose of VOC-containing materials used in solvent cleaning. The table below shows the requirements which became effective on December 1, 2001.

CURRENT LIMITS Effective 12/1/2001
SOLVENT CLEANING ACTIVITY VOC g/l(lb/gal) VOC Composite Partial Pressure mm Hg @ 20oC (68oF) VOCg/l(lb/gal)
Cleaning of Coatings, or Adhesives Application Equipment 950(7.9) 35 550(4.6)
Cleaning of Ink Application Equipment      

(ii) Flexographic Printing

100(0.83) 3 50(0.42)

(iv) Lithographic or Letter Press Printing

     

(I) Roller Wash - Step 1

900 10 600(5.0)

(II) Roller Wash- Step 2, Blanket Wash, & On-Press Components

900 10 800(6.7)

(III) Removable Press Components

    50(0.42)

(v) Screen Printing

1070(8.9) 5 750(6.3)

(vi) Ultraviolet Ink Application Equipment (except screen printing)

800(6.7) 33 800(6.7)

(vii) Specialty Flexographic Printing

810(6.8) 21 600(5.0)
 
WOODWORKING OPERATIONS FURTHER REGULATED

The SCAQMD has typically regulated emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds from southland wood companies. The agency now proposes to regulate particulate matter (PM10) emissions from this industry.

The new rule (Rule 1137-Woodworking Operations) will apply to various businesses, including commercial lumber mills, furniture manufacturers, and cabinet shops. The rule will require new and expanded facilities to install baghouses or equivalent controls by July 1, 2002 and to eliminate visible emissions. Existing facilities will have to eliminate their visible emissions by January 1, 2004.

The District estimates that the rule will reduce PM10 emissions by 0.06 tons per day and impact about 500 facilities in the South Coast Basin. The cost of reducing these emissions is approximated to be $2,900 per ton of PM10.

 
CERTIFICATION PROGRAM FOR DISTRIBUTIVE GENERATION

Distributive generation (DG) is a relatively new source in California. The Air Resources Board estimates that there are about 100 units (excluding solar units) most of which were installed as demonstration projects. Distributive generation is a supplement to grid-supplied electricity located near the source of use. DG is the prime on site-electrical source and does not include emergency backup generators or portable equipment. Some of the units have the capacity to create electricity and use waste heat from the process to heat water. The estimated life of a DG unit is approximately four years. Examples of distributive generation units are:

  • Small engines (natural gas fueled)
  • Microturbines (natural gas fueled)
  • Fuel cells
  • Solar (photovoltaic)
  • Wind
In response to Senate Bill 1298 (Bowen), ARB will certify distributive generation units that are not subject to local air district rules. The agency will require manufacturers to meet clean emission standards. The emissions standards for new units are divided into two tiers. The first tier becomes effective in 2003 and the second in 2007.
Table 1. 2003 Emission Standards (lb/MW-hr)
Pollutant DG Unit not Integrated with Combined Heat and Power DG Unit With Combined Heat and Power
Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx)
0.5
0.7
Carbon Monoxide (CO)
6.0
6.0
Carbon Monoxide (CO)
1.0
1.0
Particulate Matter An emission limit corresponding to natural gas with fuel sulfur content no more than 1 grain/100 scf An emission limit corresponding to natural gas with fuel sulfur content no more than 1 grain/100 scf
Table 2. 2007 Emission Standards (lb/MW-hr)
Pollutant
DG Unit
Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx)
0.07
Carbon Monoxide (CO)
0.10
Volatile Organic
Compounds (VOCs)
0.02
Particulate Matter An emission limit corresponding to natural gas with fuel sulfur content no more than 1 grain/100 scf
ARB Chairman, Allan Lloyd stated in a news release "This rule ensures that only the cleanest technology is used for the smallest electrical generation units in California. As directed by the Legislature, our certification program will provide added flexibility and incentives to manufacturers who make the biggest clean air effort."

The ARB anticipates that manufacturers with DG engines less than 100 horsepower or microturbines less than 300 kilowatts in size will make up the bulk of certifications. To encourage zero-emission technologies, manufacturers who certify zero emission equipment will not be charged the $2500 certification fee and may receive emission credits. Combined heat and power units that achieve minimum efficiency of 60 percent may also obtain credits. In addition, manufacturers who meet the 2007 standards prior to 2003 may have their 2003 certification fee waived.

The Legislation also required the ARB to provide a guidance document to California's 35 local air districts for power plants under 50 MW. The agency believes that the adoption of the certification program will facilitate the permitting for those power plants under district authority and address current and future control technology requirements.

 
NEW EPA REGIONAL ADMINISTRATOR APPOINTED

Wayne Nastri, a longtime environmental consultant and entrepreneur, was appointed as the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency's Region 9 office in San Francisco. The office is responsible for California, Nevada, Arizona, Hawaii and the Pacific Islands.

Nastri, served as the Governor's appointee to the Governing Board of the South Coast Air Quality Management District. His background includes service on Cal/EPA's Department of Toxic Substances Control External Advisory Committee and work as Legislative Director of the California Business Council. In addition, he has served on the California Air Resources Board Zero Emission Vehicle implementation advisory committee, the Brownfields sub-committee for Cal EPA's Department of Toxic Substances Control Site Mitigation Program and the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment's Private Site Manager's advisory committee.

For the past six years, Nastri has been the President of a Southern California environmental consulting firm. Prior to that, he was the President of a government public affairs firm and has also founded and worked at various other environmental businesses. "EPA is fortunate to have the leadership of such an experienced environmental professional. He brings a wealth of knowledge about environmental issues and relationships with the states, which will be critical in developing more progressive approaches to protecting the environment and public health," said EPA Administrator Christie Whitman.

 
EPA PROPOSES FULL APPROVAL OF SOUTH COAST TITLE V PROGRAM

Title V is facility-wide federal permitting program, which applies to major sources. Back in August of 1996, the EPA granted interim approval of the South Coast's program but identified deficiencies with the South Coast proposal. The interim approval notice outlined the program deficiencies and described revisions that had to be made in order for the District's program to receive full approval.

One of EPA's conditions for full Title V program approval was to eliminate the provision in the Health and Safety Code that exempts "any equipment used in agricultural operations in the growing of crops or the raising of fowl or animals" from the requirements to obtain a permit.

In a letter of September 2001, EPA Region 9 concluded that there needs to be a better understanding of the sources and the emissions associated with agricultural operations. The agency determined that including these operations under the Title V permitting process would not be "an appropriate utilization of limited local, state and federal resources."

The SCAQMD has revised Rules 3000, 3002, 3004 and 3005 to address EPA's comments. EPA is now proposing to grant full approval of the SCAQMD Operating Permit Program.

 
URBAN AIR POLLUTION INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

Various international government decision-makers, environmentalists and industry leaders gathered in Anaheim, California to discuss urban air pollution. Speakers introduced the audience to the latest technology in pollution control and prevention.

Representatives from the Mexican government talked about the critical situation in Mexico City and expressed their interest to look at California as a model for their air programs.

The conference took a close look at the emissions from mobile sources. A representative from the Environmental Protection Agency pointed out that emission reductions from stationary sources are increasingly difficult to achieve. Thus, regulators must look to mobile sources in order to achieve substantial future emission reductions.

Innovative technologies showcased included: Fuel cell technologies, electric vehicles, ultra clean natural gas fired internal combustion engines, add-on control devices and ultraviolet curing technologies.

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